Liteon Eco Leaf

The Liteon Eco Leaf is an up and coming window blind.  The Eco Leaf is designed to mitigate intense direct sun traveling through a window, provide adequate ventilation, as well as store energy to use for gentle lighting when the sun goes down.  The fabric has integrated solar cells that recharge in sunlight, then release the light later in the day.  The product is meant to imitate leaves, absorbing energy, providing shade, allowing for soft light as well as ventilation.

This product boasts of keying in on three items: having a low carbon life, being seamless and simple in design, and also incorporating smart technology.  The window blind has low energy consumption, and clearly uses passive technology to store energy.  Liteon also controls the amount of sunlight coming through the window, allowing for shade as well as ambient light.  Eco Leaf includes smart controls in an inconspicuous display at the bottom, allowing time, weather, etc to be displayed.  The product is also easily stored and maintained.

The entire piece is assembled on a railing, with a pull mechanism to raise and lower the blind.  Then the product is created in layers, with a translucent fabric made of polyester filament as the first layer, followed by a hybrid display (e-ink in the daytime, and oled at nightime).  Finally there is a sheet of solar cells and a backing of translucent fabric again enclosing the piece.  A battery cell exists in the rod to store energy.

Seth, R. (2011, November 15). Liteon Eco Leaf. Retrieved April 13, 2015, from http://www.yankodesign.com/2011/11/15/power-blind/

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2 thoughts on “Liteon Eco Leaf

  1. This is such a great concept for window blinds! I am not crazy about the design though! I feel like the pattern and style of the blinds will really limit their client base. I would love to see this technology applied to a simpler blind system that could be put in a variety of different environments.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is a perfect example of your previous article reflection on Biomimicry! By understanding photosynthesis of a leaf, the designer was able to replicate a process in a new solution/product. I would be interested to see one of these in person and to know the cost. I also wonder if they will be creating different patterns or if the “leaf” pattern is critical to the engineering of the product.

    Like

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